SPORTS

'Bismarck's War' Review: A Fast But Fateful Fight

‘Two brothers had left; only one returned,” writes Rachel Chrastil. The survivor was Dietrich von Lassberg, a 22-year-old subaltern in the Bavarian army. A year earlier he had exulted in his diary: “War! War with France!” The brother who died was Rudolf, shot in the head in a battle outside Orléans in November 1870. On Christmas Eve, Dietrich sat around the campfire in silent misery, drinking hot grog from a tin cup, dreaming of his family back in Munich, and pondering the “shadow side and horror” of war. In “Bismarck’s War: The Franco-Prussian War and the Making of Modern Europe,” Ms. Chrastil, a historian at Xavier University, deftly makes use of Dietrich’s diary and different sources to enliven her bigger evaluation of the struggle’s origins and progress.

Although the six-month Franco-Prussian War was among the many shortest of all main European conflicts, it introduced Dietrich and his comrades sights that robbed them of any temptation to triumphalism. The struggle’s mixture of deadly new weapons (breechloading rifles, machine weapons, metal cannon) and big armies left mountains of lifeless and hordes of completely mutilated wounded: In the murderous engagement at Gravelotte in August 1870, the Prussians misplaced twice as many males as that they had throughout the whole Austro-Prussian War of 1866.

Copyright ©2023 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

Source: www.wsj.com

The post 'Bismarck's War' Review: A Fast But Fateful Fight appeared first on News NCR.

Source

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button

JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE JOSSE